Tag Archives: chronic idiopathic urticaria

Let Me Google That For You!

Okay, okay. I know. *sigh* I’m being asked by more than one reader to explain how helminthic therapy works. I’m sorry. I thought you were all mind readers. Or that you would just friggin’ Google it.

There are countless articles out there written by much better writers than myself. That’s the real reason I didn’t explain it. But anyway, I’ll quit making excuses. Here goes….

How does helminthic therapy work? 

Helminthic therapy works by reintroducing organisms to the body that we have evolved with. It’s intention is to correct an imbalance within the immune system.

The developed world has become obsessed with hygiene and the elimination of germs and parasites from our society as a way to keep the population healthy. Little thought and understanding has been given to the consequences to our immune systems as a result of these actions.

Humans evolved alongside parasites as well as a whole host of protozoa, bacteria, and germs. The importance of this close relationship between man and the organisms we have evolved with forms the basis of the Hygiene Hypothesis.

Our immune systems have evolved to expect parasites to be present in our bodies. When we cleanse our bodies to such a degree that the immune system has nothing to work against it does not simply stop working. It starts reacting in inappropriate ways and this is when it’s possible for diseases involving allergies and autoimmune issues to arise.

The reintroduction of parasites, such as hookworm and whipworm, is a step in redressing the natural evolutionary balance of the immune system; giving the immune system a target to work against, thus halting the destructive actions of the immune system on it’s own tissues or benign substances such as pollen, animal dander, etc.

It is also known that, in order to live in our bodies unharmed by our immune system, helminths secrete substances that turn down the immune response. This is believed to result in a better regulated immune system; one less likely to attack it’s own tissues or benign substances.*

And I’ll continue on with some more information that I have at hand…

Who can benefit from helminthic therapy?

It is possible that anyone with a chronic inflammatory condition or one involving autoimmune related inflammatory diseases, autoimmunity, or atopic diseases such as asthma, could benefit from helminthic therapy. It is impossible to predict if any one person will respond to the therapy in advance. The only way to test it is to try it. Diseases/disorders that have responded include: asthma, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, eczema, psoriasis, hay fever, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, Sjogren’s Syndrome, and allergies. 

It’s worth noting that the above list of diseases/disorders does not cover all success stories. There are many more conditions that helminthic therapy has helped. I’ve read a pretty extensive list myself.

A few more things before I sign off for the night…

So far, no side effects which is to be expected on day 2. Just the little inoculation rash which you can see at the top of this post. In case you forgot, that’s where the worms crawled into my skin.

As always, thanks for reading. I sincerely appreciate the love and support.

* the italicized text above was not written by me; I reworded it a tiny bit. I do not want to give actual written credit to the source due to my strong stance on not mentioning the name of my provider in this blog.

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Inoculation Day: Take 35 helminths and call me in the morning!

Well, I did it.

My worms arrived this afternoon.

I had considered posting photos of all of the materials that arrived but I thought better of it. As I’ve mentioned before, I won’t do anything that could potentially jeopardize my providers operations. I’d like to continue to receive therapy from them and I’d like for others to be able to continue as well. So, I’ll have to do it the old fashioned way and describe it all in writing. Don’t worry, I’ll throw up a few photos to keep things interesting.

After allowing the materials to come to room temperature, I started to prepare for inoculation. Two small vials, one bulb pipette, and a gauzy bandage were received. (No instructions come along in the package in case of interception by unknown entities. You’re sent all instructions via email.) One vial contained 35 hookworm larvae (which are not visible to the naked eye). The other vial was an unknown solution of perhaps saline that was simply used to rinse out the larvae vial and bulb pipette after placing all of that material onto the center of the bandage. After all of this was complete I slapped the bandage onto my inner, upper arm.

inoculation bandage!
inoculation bandage! there are worms in there!

That’s really all there is to it friends! But wait, I haven’t really gotten to the good stuff yet.

In my instruction packet, I had read that you should start to feel a stinging/burning/itching sensation right around the 7 minute mark. This proved to be fairly accurate in my case. This is how you know your larvae arrived to your home alive. You’re feeling them burrow into your skin. No big deal, right? Honestly, it’s not a big deal at all. It’s much less horrifying than it sounds. And for me, a person who has burning/itching skin on the regular, this shit has NOTHING on what I deal with daily. For example, the hives I have elsewhere are much more bothersome to me right now. So much so that I don’t even feel the inoculation rash at all. However, I’ve read and am told that the inoculation rash can get worse as the treatment timeline progresses.

The photos below show the current state of my skin. I have other areas that I haven’t photographed out of decency. These photos show the reasons why I’ve infected myself with parasitic worms today.

crook of my arm; urticaria/eczema.
crook of my arm; urticaria/eczema.
stefarm2
crook of my other arm; urticaria/eczema.
stefchest
chest, shoulder,neck,breast; urticaria/eczema.
stefhand
hand and wrist; urticaria/eczema.

 

I’m about 6 hours post inoculation and I’ll be leaving the bandage on for a full 12 hours. All larvae should have wriggled into my bloodstream by now.

I have access to a great document (written carefully and expertly by a fellow helminth host) that includes a rough day by day timeline of what to expect post inoculation. It contains information on where your larvae should be in your body and when and what side effects you’re likely to experience on certain days.

I’ll be documenting all side effects and anything that I feel at all here. I’ve been in touch with my provider this evening and have let them know that my worms arrived alive. My next dose of hookworm should be arriving in 3 months time. Exciting!

Stay tuned until tomorrow when I post photo(s) of the inoculation rash. I’m afraid it(they) may pale in comparison to my urticaria photos from today.